School of Media, Culture & Design

Psychology

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

The goal of psychology is to describe, predict and explain human thought and behavior. At Woodbury, psychology is applied to helping people and communities thrive and solving problems. Through research, critical analysis and hands-on experiences, our faculty actively mentor students in applying classroom knowledge to real-world issues.

Apply Request Information Take a Tour
mcd_showcase_2016_008

Create Your Future

Woodbury’s psychology major examines the complexities of human behavior as individuals, members of groups and as part of the larger social community. Courses in Developmental Psychology, Personality, Abnormal Psychology, Social Psychology, Psychology of Gender, Media, Psychology and Consumer Behavior, are just some of the course offerings. The program prepares students to work in diverse fields such as psychology, counseling, human behavior, social services and media communications. Students receive a strong foundation in psychological theory and application that successfully prepares them to continue their education at the graduate school level. Over 90 percent of our students who apply to graduate school are accepted. A part of that preparation incudes a senior thesis project in which students develop original, independent research on a variety of topics, over 93% of which have been accepted for presentation at national and regional psychology conferences.

Top reasons to come to Woodbury:

  • Strong focus on one-on-one mentorship with faculty, building research skills and preparing future professionals.
  • Unique opportunities to explore the connections between psychology and rich areas of interest such as popular media, social behavior and human development.
  • Networks with peers, faculty and the community that support collaboration and professional development.
  • Internships at local organizations that increase graduate employability.

Internships & Careers

Internship opportunities:

  •  Cri-Help
  •  Bridges Academy
  • The Help Group
  • Langdon Elementary School
  • Los Angeles Child Guidance Clinic
  • Southern California Neuropsychology Group
  • Institute on Aging
  • Ultimate Lifestyle Center
  • SOBER College

Internships are a required component of the BA degree in Psychology.

Career opportunities:

  • Advertising and marketing
  • Behavioral interventions
  • Behavioral rehabilitation
  • Counseling and therapy
  • Drug and alcohol counseling
  • Educational psychology
  • Information technology
  • Human resources
  • Human factors/environmental psychology
  • Industrial/organizational psychology
  • Law and law enforcement
  • Market research and analysis
  • Marriage and family therapy
  • Occupational therapy
  • Politics
  • Public policy
  • Research and program evaluation
  • Social work and public health
  • Sports psychology
  • Academia and teaching
  • Technology and game design

“My favorite aspect of the program is accessibility to very knowledgeable professors. They are able to help you become a successful student, and a stronger researcher.”


— Emily Schatz, Alumna

“It was great being able to develop close relationships with all my professors; it made the learning environment so much more comfortable and even fun.”


— Vanessa Rountree, Alumna

“The program offered a unique bonding experience. Amazing relationships with professors and incredible friendships with peers helped to strengthen our contributions to the psychology community.”


— Arvin Arakelian, Alumnus

Facilities

Intimate classrooms, state-of-the-art auditorium, MAC and PC computer labs, on-campus library, and art galleries. Research tools, such as statistical analysis software (SPSS), language analysis software, and jWORX physiology research hardware and software.

Courses

The Psychology curriculum is designed to prepare graduates through a solid understanding and mastery of the fundamentals of psychological science. It provides students with a thorough foundation in theory, research design, statistics and critical thinking, along with an emphasis on applying psychological principles to real world issues.

PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology
This course introduces students to the basic concepts of psychology and the psychological processes of perception, learning, thinking, motivation, personality, development, and social behavior. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisite: WRIT 111 Academic Writing I.

PSYC 210 Developmental Psychology
This course focuses on the study of the psychological development of the person from the prenatal period through old age and death. The course emphasizes theories and their applications to the understanding of the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional changes that occur throughout the human life span. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture, or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design; and COMM 120 Public Speaking.

PSYC 305 Personality
This course focuses on the study of historical development of major personality theories, including psychoanalytic, humanistic and learning approaches. Methods of personality measurement, such as objective and projective tests, inventories and other assessment procedures will also be explored. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design; and COMM 120 Public Speaking.

PSYC 309 Abnormal Psychology
Abnormal psychology is the study of disorders of a psychological nature. This course is intended to familiarize the student with the symptoms, causes and treatments of a variety of such disorders, including mood, anxiety, and personality disorders as well as disorders related to substance abuse. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design; and COMM 120 Public Speaking.

PSYC 320 Sensation and Perception
This course focuses on understanding how individuals obtain information from the environment and various theories as to how that information is processed. Topics will include basic sensory physiology, psychophysics, visual perception, auditory perception, tactile perception, and the chemical senses. 3 units. Prerequisites: MATH 049 Elementary Algebra; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design; LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; and PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology.

PSYC 300 Social Psychology
Social psychology is concerned with the interaction of individuals with other individuals and groups. Topics include attitudes, prejudice, persuasion, obedience and attraction. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design; LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture, or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; COMM 120 Public Speaking; and PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology. Majors must pass PSYC 300 with a grade of “C” or higher.

PSYC 306 Influence and Persuasion
This course explores on how people influence themselves and each other singly and in groups. The activities of compliance professionals such as salespersons, con artists, politicians, etc. are stressed. Additionally, concentration is placed on research into the effects of influence and the ethics of the application of influence. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design and COMM 120 Public Speaking.

PSYC 490 Internship
Students obtain practical, on-the-job training in a setting of business, law, government agency, or other organization. Work experience is complemented by an academic requirement and periodic meetings with the student’s on-campus internship advisor. Students are required to complete ninety hours at the internship site, with an additional thirty hours devoted to weekly written summaries as well as a final written review of the experience. 3 units. Prerequisite: Junior standing, Psychology majors only.

PSYC 221 Statistics for Behavioral Sciences
This course emphasizes a conceptual rather than computational understanding of basic statistical concepts, including descriptive and inferential statistics, probability and hypothesis testing. A key component of the course is the introduction to statistical computation using the SPSS computer program. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisite: Placement exam or MATH 149 Intermediate Algebra with a grade of “C” or better. Majors must pass with a grade of “C” or higher.

PSYC 230 Foundations of Research Methods
This course introduces students to the methods psychologists use to conduct research. Students will learn about the scientific method—the universal language of science—as well as how to form research questions and hypotheses, how to design and critique studies, how to analyze and interpret research data, and how to control variables. In particular, an important way in which students will learn about research methods in this course is through performing research studies rather than just reading about them. 3 units. Prerequisites: WRIT 112 Academic Writing l; PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology; PSYC 221 Into Statistics for Behvrl Sciences; and a minimum of three upper division Psychology courses. Majors must pass the class with a grade of “C” or better.

PSYC 331 Advanced Applied Statistics
This course examines the application of advanced statistical methods including multivariate and nonparametric analyses. Course focuses on selecting appropriate statistical analyses and computer skills to perform the analyses using SPSS, and the interpretation of computer generated results. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisite: PSYC 221 Statistics for Behavioral Sciences. Must pass with a grade of “C” or higher.

PSYC 402 Advanced Research Methods
This course examines advanced experimental and research methodology in contemporary psychology. Specific topics from areas of student interest are applied to hypothesis formation, experimental design, observation, measurement and data collection. Individuals will be expected to complete a scientific research study from conception to implementation to statistical analysis to written APA-style manuscript. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology; PSYC 221 Intro Statistics for Behvrl Sciences, and have completed a minimum of six upper division Psychology courses. Students must pass PSYC 402 Adv Research Methods with a grade of “C” or higher. Senior Standing, Psychology majors only.

PSYC 410 Senior Thesis
The course emphasizes the student’s ability to synthesize and integrate the knowledge gained throughout the program. Students will be expected to possess an appropriate range of expertise regarding the field and science of psychology and to translate this knowledge into impacting the knowledge base of understanding of human behavior in real world settings. This is accomplished through a capstone written research project honed from the Advanced Research Methods course. Students will work independently with their Senior Thesis faculty member. 3 units. Prerequisite: Senior standing, Psychology majors only.

PSYC 301 Group Processes
This course focuses on the study of intergroup processes and structure, including cooperation, hostility and prejudice, stereotypes, influence, and conformity. The class will examine leadership and membership issues in such settings as families, study group and team projects. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture, or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design; and COMM 120 Public Speaking.

PSYC 314 Psychology of Gender
This course focuses on the examination of the concepts and issues related to gender viewed from a broad range of disciplines within the social sciences with an emphasis on historical antecedents, evolution, biology, and cultural norms. Issues include the meaning of gender in society, the development of gender identity, sex roles, and gender differences in aptitudes and abilities. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design and COMM 120 Public Speaking.

PSYC 315 Industrial/Organizational Psychology
This course explores the study of human organizations in the workplace. Topics include cultural issues involved in the development of industry and the structure of these organizations, the efficacy of various organizational structures on productivity and well-being of the employees, organizational structure as a reflection of values and norms, and the effect of changes in a culture on organizational behavior and vice versa. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II and WRIT 21, Rhetoric and Design and COMM 120 Public Speaking.

PSYC 316 Cross-Cultural Psychology
This course looks at the search for commonalities and differences in behavior, attitudes and norms across cultures. The focus is on the applicability of western theories of human psychology to other cultures, broadly defined to include nationality, race, ethnicity, gender, and social class. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design and COMM 120 Public Speaking.

PSYC 317 Media Psychology
This course encompasses the behavioral aspects of media in activities, events, theories, and practices regarding the effects and behaviors stimulated by media elements. These include pictures, sound, graphics, and content and their effects on the senses and intelligences. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design; COMM 120 Public Speaking and PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology.

PSYC 318 Consumer Behavior
This course examines the application of psychological theory and applied research methods to the study of consumer behavior. The psychological processes that influence consumer decision making will be addressed including product recognition, alternative evaluation and choice behavior, and post-purchase attitudes and behavior. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design; COMM 120 Public Speaking and PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology.

Studio Faculty

Faculty Directory

Our faculty are accomplished caring academics and professionals dedicated to supporting the success of students throughout their academic journey. They bring their professional expertise to students and work closely with them to teach the skills and theory required to enter professional practice or pursue advanced study. Through this individual attention, we foster close mentoring relationships between faculty and students in a supportive and encouraging environment.

FACULTY DIRECTORY

University accredited by:

WSCUC: Senior College and University Commission (formerly WASC)