Services for Students with Disabilities

Policy and Procedures for Accommodating Students and Applicants with Disabilities

Woodbury University is committed to providing students of all abilities access to all University programs, services, and activities as required by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). To make this possible, Woodbury grants reasonable accommodations to qualified students with disabilities.

Although U.S. law does not require students to report disabilities, individuals must disclose and document disabilities to the University’s Coordina- tor of Disabilities Accessibility Services in order to receive disability-based accommodations.

 

 

Reasonable Accommodations

An accommodation is a modification that allows equal opportunity for academic or physical accessibility. The Coordinator of Disabilities  and Accessibility Services will determine which accommodations are appropriate on a case-by- case basis by reviewing the documentation provided. Accommodations will not be considered reasonable if they would fundamentally alter the nature of the program or if they would be unduly burdensome for the University, either financially or administratively. Accommodations granted by Woodbury University might include:

  1. Readers
  2. Interpreters
  3. Notetakers
  4. Alternative textbook formats
  5. Recording of lectures
  6. Course load modifications
  7. Excused medical absences
  8. Extended time for exams
  9. Alternative settings for exams. Students who have been approved for this accommodation must follow University procedures outlined in the Student Handbook for each exam.
  10. Non-academic and temporary accommodations. Please see the Student Handbook for details.

Procedures for Registering for Reasonable Accommodations

Request Accommodations

At least two weeks before the beginning of each semester, a student seeking accommodations for his or her disability should schedule an appointment with the Coordinator of Disabilities and Accessibility Services and complete an Accommodations Request form. Appointments can be scheduled by calling Student Affairs at 818.394.3345 or by visiting our office in the Whitten Student Center.
Accommodations Request forms can be found in the Whitten Student Center or downloaded from the portal site at my.woodbury.edu.

Submit Documentation

Provide proper documentation as specified in the Student Handbook under General and Comprehensive Documentation; Policy and Procedures for Accommodating Students and Applicants with Disabilities.

Discuss Requested Accommodations

Accommodations will be discussed after a student has met with the Coordinator of Disabilities and Accessibility Services to formally document his or her disability. Evaluation of documentation and the possible granting of accommodations will be completed within 5 – 10 business days.

Notify Instructors

Provision of approved accommodations will be documented with a completed Notification of Academic Accommodation Plan (NAAP) form provided by the Coordinator of Disabilities and Accessibility Services. It is the student’s responsibility to pick up copies of the NAAP from the Coordinator of Disabilities and Accessibility Services to deliver them to instructors, and to clarify his or her needs with each individual instructor.
International students requesting accommodations will be required to have their documentation reviewed and approved by a Designated School Official (DSO).

Basic Information

It is the student’s responsibility to identify the need for an accommodation, to provide appropriate documentation for all requests, and to keep appointments related to the provision of accommodations.

Accommodations are not retroactive

A student who is not registered with the Coordinator of Disabilities and Accessibility Services will not be granted retakes of exams and/or assignments based on newly reported disabilities.

Students who wish to be considered for reasonable accommodations must submit current documentation from a professional who is appropriately licensed by the state to diagnose medical, psychological and/or learning disabilities. Additional information might also be required on a case-by- case basis. Documentation will only be accepted from practitioners who are licensed in the United States. Documentation from practitioners who are only licensed outside the U.S. will not be accepted.

Evaluator Qualifications

The professional conducting assessments and rendering diagnoses must have comprehensive training for the specific disability being addressed.

All diagnosticians must be impartial individuals who are not family members of the student.

The name, title, and professional credentials of the evaluator, including information about license or certification, area of specialization, employment, and state in which the individual practices, should be clearly stated in the documentation.

Current Documentation

The University requires that submitted documentation be no older than three years; however, older documentation of conditions that are permanent or non-varying might be acceptable. The University reserves the right to request additional information to determine eligibility, as well as updates as deemed necessary.

Specific Documentation Guidelines

  • Provide educational, developmental, and medical
  • Include the administration of a measure of intellectual ability, such as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales (3rd Edition) or the equivalent, and a measure of academic achievement, such as the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement (3rd Edition) or equivalent.
  • Include test results with subtest scores scaled for adults and classification ranges associated with the scores, such as low average, average, above average, etc.
  • Describe functional limitations and explain how the disability impacts the student’s daily functioning and
  • Recommend accommodations appropriate for higher

If it is determined that the existing documentation is incomplete or inadequate for ascertaining the extent of the disability or the need for reason- able accommodations, the University may require additional documentation. The cost of obtaining documentation is borne by the student.

Please consult with Student Affairs for specific docu- mentation guidelines related to particular disabilities. An Individualized Education Program (IEP) or a 504 Plan is not sufficient documentation of a disability.

Documentation for Psychological Disabilities should:

  • State the specific disability and relate the disability to the applicable professional standards, such as DSM-V.
  • Describe the evaluation method(s) used to establish the This can include clinical interview, psychological assessment battery, etc.
  • Include test scores from any standardized diagnostic tests, if
  • Discuss current symptoms and the degree of their impact on daily living activities in an educational
  • Recommend accommodations appropriate for higher

If it is determined that the existing documentation is incomplete or inadequate for ascertaining the extent of the disability or the need for reason- able accommodations, the University may require additional documentation. The cost of obtaining documentation is borne by the student.

Because the impact of many psychological conditions can change over time, annual evaluations might be required.

Specific Document Guidelines

Documentation for Learning Disabilities should:

  1. Provide educational, developmental, and medical history.
  2. Include the administration of a measure of intellectual ability, such as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales (3rd Edition) or the equivalent, and a measure of academic achievement, such as the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement (3rd Edition) or equivalent.
  3. Include test results with subtest scores scaled for adults and classification ranges associated with the scores, such as low average, average, above average, etc.
  4. Describe functional limitations and explain how the disability impacts the student’s daily functioning and abilities.
  5. Recommend accommodations appropriate for higher education.

If it is determined that the existing documentation is incomplete or inadequate for ascertaining the extent of the disability or the need for reason- able accommodations, the University may require additional documentation. The cost of obtaining documentation is borne by the student.

Please consult with Student Affairs for specific documentation guidelines related to particular disabilities. An Individualized Education Program (IEP) or a 504 Plan is not sufficient documentation of a disability.

Documentation for Psychological Disabilities should:

  1. State the specific disability and relate the disability to the applicable professional standards, such as DSM-V.
  2. Describe the evaluation method(s) used to establish the diagnosis. This can include clinical interview, psychological assessment battery, etc.
  3. Include test scores from any standardized diagnostic tests, if administered.
  4. Discuss current symptoms and the degree of their impact on daily living activities in an educational environment.
  5. Recommend accommodations appropriate for higher education.

If it is determined that the existing documentation is incomplete or inadequate for ascertaining the extent of the disability or the need for reason- able accommodations, the University may require additional documentation. The cost of obtaining documentation is borne by the student.

Because the impact of many psychological conditions can change over time, annual evaluations might be required.

Documentation for Physical/Medical Disabilities should:

  1. Indicate a diagnosis of a physical or medical condition consistent with established clinical criteria.
  2. Describe the functional impact of the disability or condition on activities of daily living in an educational setting.
  3. Recommend accommodations appropriate for highereducation.
  4. Discuss the nature and progression of the disability; for example, if the condition is chronic, intermittent, etc.
  5. Include information related to the need for the frequency of re-evaluation.

International students requesting accommodations will be required to have their documentation reviewed and approved by a Designated School Official (DSO).

Grievance Guidelines

The University has an internal grievance procedure for resolution of complaints alleging violations of disability policy. Students may also use this grievance procedure to appeal the University’s decisions regarding requests for accommodation.
To file a grievance, students should contact the Associate Dean of Students, located in the Whitten Student Center