Grant Proposal Request

For faculty and staff members

This form is for a faculty or staff member at Woodbury University to propose a grant idea. (This form is NOT a grant application.) Upon approval of a grant proposal request, the Office of University Advancement will develop and write the grant. If developed, the grant writing will be done in collaboration with the original proposer.

The grant proposer may have a consultation with the Advancement Office’s part-time grant writer (Rich Matzen) before completing this template, but the grant proposer completes the template, not Rich.

Rich and the Senior Academic Vice President, Randy Stauffer, decide together whether to approve developing a final grant proposal or not. They plan to approve or prioritize grant ideas according to the idea’s impact and the university’s priorities. Grant ideas with the highest impact and greatest priority will affect positive change university-wide or at the university level. Grants, with the second highest impact and priority, typically only affect change within a school, COLA (College of Liberal Studies), the Library, or Student Affairs. And grants, with impact and priority, may affect change at the department or office level.

Grant writer Rich Matzen will inform the template’s signatories, first, whether the proposal was approved (or needs revision or added information), and second, if the proposal is approved, what is the timeline for writing and submitting the grant.

Note: If a faculty or staff member has completed an entire grant application for a nonprofit or for a corporation, then that person does NOT need to complete the Grant Proposal Request Template. Instead, that person should email the completed grant application to Rich Matzen (rich.matzen@woodbury.edu). Then, the application will be reviewed by Rich and Randy, particularly regarding how stakeholders may be affected assuming that the grant is successful.

Following this form, you may read “Grant Writing in the Office of Advancement: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)” that provides details for how the Advancement Office supports grant writing.

 

Grant Writing in the Office of Advancement: Frequently Asked Questions

What kinds of grants does the Advancement Office write?

The Office of Advancement writes grants that are submitted to philanthropic organizations for example a non-profit organization or a corporation, that’s planning on donating money to support education through their grant program.

While the Advancement Office takes the lead in writing philanthropic grants, the office does not have, nor solicit, grants that fulfill financial aid purposes for students. If a student would like to receive a grant (i.e., money given to students for financial aid purposes), then the student should contact Financial Aid Office (818.252.5273).

Also, the Office of Advancement does not take the lead on state and federal grants. So, if a faculty or staff member has an idea for a state or federal grant or would like information about the university’s state or federal grant opportunities, then please contact Mauro Diaz, Dean of International Affairs (818.252.5297).

What is the process for writing a grant with the assistance and support of the Advancement Office?

The faculty or staff member who has the grant idea, completes the Grant Proposal Request Template and submits it. As indicated on the template, the grant proposer needs to have the support (and signatures) of his or her supervisor (e.g., department chair) and either his or her dean or the Senior Academic Vice President.

The Grant Proposal Request Template is NOT the final grant proposal. The Advancement Office’s part-time grant writer (Rich Matzen) writes the final grant proposal, in consultation with the original grant proposer. When the grant proposal (or LOI, letter of inquiry) is complete, the Advancement Office submits it to the granting agency.

What is the process for proposing a grant idea that supports a center (e.g., the Center for Leadership, Center for Entrepreneurship, Writing Center, and Agency for Civic Engagement)?

Each center is associated with a school or the College of Liberal Arts. Therefore, the process is this: The faculty or staff member who has the grant idea, completes the Grant Proposal Request Template; solicits the support and signatures of the center’s director and his or her dean; and submits the completed form.

The Grant Proposal Requested Template is NOT the final grant proposal. If the grant proposal request is selected, the Advancement Office’s part-time grant writer (Rich Matzen) writes the final grant proposal, in consultation with the original grant proposer. When the grant proposal (or LOI, letter of inquiry) is complete, the Advancement Office submits it to the granting agency.

Who does a faculty member or department chair contact with a grant idea?

A faculty member should first secure the support of both his or her chair and dean. A chair, of course, would need to secure support of the dean. Then, the faculty member or chair—the grant proposer—completes the Grant Proposal Request Template. The grant proposer may have a consultation with the Advancement Office’s part-time grant writer (Rich Matzen) before completing the template, but the grant proposer completes the template, not the part-time grant writer, Rich.

Who can send the part-time grant writer (Rich Matzen), grant ideas?

Any faculty member, staff person, or department chair may propose a grant idea, and the way to propose a grant is by completing the Grant Proposal Request Template. The grant proposer—the faculty member, staff person, or department chair—may consult with the grant writer (Rich Matzen) before completing the template, but the grant proposer, not the grant writer, completes the Grant Proposal Request Template.

However, if the faculty member, staff person, or department chair is doubtful of the usefulness of completing the Grant Proposal Request Template, then contact the grant writer (Rich Matzen). This may be the case when a grant proposer has a specific corporation grant in mind.

Do all grant ideas from faculty, departments, and schools go to the part-time grant writer (Rich Matzen)?

Yes. But the grant writer does not decide which grant proposals to develop and submit. Rather, the grant writer and the Senior Academic Vice President (Randy Sauffer) make that decision together and according to the grant’s impact and priority.

In general, grants, with the highest impact and greatest priority, affect change university-wide or at the university level. Grants, with the second highest impact and priority, affect change within a school or the College of Liberal Studies. And grants, with impact and priority, may exist at the department level.

How can I learn about the status of a grant idea?

The part-time grant writer (Rich Matzen) will inform the Grant Proposal Request Template’s signatories, first, whether the proposal was approved (or needs revision or added information), and second, if the proposal is approved, what is the timeline for writing and submitting the grant.

Also, the Advancement Office maintains a database that enables monthly “status” reports to be sent to the signatories. These status reports include the submission date and when (and if) the granting agency responded; and if the grant application were successful, the reports will include details such as funds availability and required follow-up reports.

What happens after a grant idea is accepted via the Grant Proposal Request Template?

The Advancement Office becomes the steward for the grant which includes reporting to the grant proposers (and university community), the grant’s progress in terms of…
• the grant’s submission date,
• granting agency’s response (and date),
• date for distribution of funds (for accepted grants),
• and reporting the grant’s effectiveness (i.e., following the grant’s reporting requirements).

Who determines what grant ideas the Advancement Office will develop?

The Advancement Office’s part-time grant writer does not decide which grant proposals to develop and submit. Rather, the grant writer and the Senior Academic Vice President (Randy Stauffer) make that decision together, according to the grant’s impact and priority.

In general, grants, with the highest impact and greatest priority, affect change university-wide or at the university level. Grants, with the second highest impact and priority, affect change within a school or the College of Liberal Studies. And grants, with impact and priority, may exist at the department level.

Will the Advancement Office and part-time grant writer (Rich Matzen) contact deans with grant possibilities?

Possibly. In the process of developing and writing grants, the grant writer may find a grant opportunity for a school, college, center, or office. In such incidents, the grant opportunity will be shared.

The main goal of the part-time grant writer is to develop and write grant proposals (and letters of inquiry) regarding the good grant ideas originating from members of the university community.

Can a staff member suggest a grant idea?

Yes. The process for a staff member to propose a grant is the same as that for a faculty member.

That is, the staff member will be attached to a school, COLA (College of Liberal Arts), or the library, or to the Office of Academic Affairs. So then, as indicated on the Grant Proposal Request Template, the grant proposer needs to have the support of his or her supervisor and either his or her dean or the Senior Academic Vice President.

The Grant Proposal Request Template is NOT the final grant proposal. The Advancement Office’s part-time grant writer (Rich Matzen) writes the final grant proposal, regarding the grant proposals that are approved for development and are submitted to a granting agency.

Can a faculty member apply for a grant without involving the Advancement Office?

No. To be specific, if a faculty member writes a grant, that will affect the university, then that grant needs to be vetted by the Advancement Office—go through the Grant Proposal Request Template process.

Is there support or resources available for a faculty member to write a grant independent of the Advancement Office?

Yes and no. In the rare occasion that a faculty or staff member writes a grant proposal or application that does not affect anyone one on campus and does not affect any university resources, then that grant proposal or application does NOT need review by the Advancement Office.

Also, a faculty or staff member may complete an entire grant application. In this case, assuming that some campus community member and resources would be affected if the grant was successful, then the completed grant application (not a completed Grant Proposal Request Template) may be submitted directly to Rich Matzen (rich.matzen@woodbury.edu). Thereafter, it will be reviewed by him and the Senior Academic Vice President in terms of how its success may affect campus community members and resources. Assuming that all grant stakeholders are supportive and that the grant would be a positive influence if successful, the Advancement Office would submit the grant application as a collaboration between the actual grant writer and office’s part-time grant writer (Rich Matzen). Thereafter, the Advancement Office would keep the grant writer and the appropriate dean informed as to grant’s status.

Is their support for faculty members who are applying for Faculty Development Committee grants?

No. If a faculty member is writing a grant for the Faculty Development Committee (FDC), then that faculty member should ask the FDC chair or convener for assistance or for a mentor.

Does the Advancement Office support grants that students want to write?

Yes. In collaboration with the Library, the Advancement Office offers students a two-part workshop in which students learn to search for grants and how to write the grant application for the grant. These grants may be considered “free money” that lessens a student’s cost of education; however, some of these grants may also help students develop special projects representative of their major. (Look for the workshops starting in the fall of 2019.)

In addition, a student may enroll in WRIT 221 Proposal and Grant Writing (3 units). This class focuses on grant applications to non-profits and corporations.

Will the Advancement Office assist with writing grants that don’t benefit Woodbury University?

No. However, the Advancement Office is supportive of the Woodbury community offering aid to those negatively affected by a disaster. Providing such assistance is above and beyond the current charge of the Advancement Office.