School of Business

Management

Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.)

Ranked in the top 5 percent of business colleges in the world, the four-year Management program prepares you to be a leader of business or nonprofit institutions.

Apply

Create Your Future

Management starts with taking charge of your life, and doing so in a responsible yet progressive way. Managers lead, organize, analyze, communicate and ensure products or services that deliver value to the community.

Top reasons to get your management degree at Woodbury:

  • AACSB accredited
  • Networking: Our location warrants numerous internship and networking opportunities.
  • Small classes.
  • Great faculty: Teaching scholars and practitioners with impressive track records.
  • Real-world exposure: Networking and connection with potential employers.
  • Diversity: A mind-broadening environment with faculty and students from many cultures and backgrounds.
  • Creativity and entrepreneurship: Our alumni are owners/managers of several businesses with global exposure.
  • Career inspiration: Guest speakers from various professional work settings.
  • Flexible formats: Many management classes are offered in flexible formats .
  • Fun courses: A portfolio of horizon-enlarging electives.
  • Linking practice and theory: Project-based courses allow students to apply their knowledge.
_mg_6576

Internships & Careers

Internship opportunities:

  • Wells Fargo Bank
  • Space Exploration Technologies
  • Bank of America
  • US Bank
  • American Cancer Society
  • City National Bank
  • Pacific Medical Pharmacy
  • Museum of Contemporary Art
  • The World Networks
  • Glendale Adventist Medical
  • DreamWorks Animation SKG
  • Providence Health Services
  • NBC Universal
  • Aramark Uniform Services
  • Sony Network Entertainment
  • The Rubicon Project
  • Warner Bros. Entertainment
  • Aflac
  • Kaiser Permanente
  • The Motion Picture Industry Pension Plan

Internships are a required component of the BBA degree in Management.

Career opportunities:

  • Healthcare industry: pharmacy manager, project coordinator
  • Banking industry: president, vice president, branch manager
  • Food industry: general or unit manager
  • Real estate: general manager
  • Technology: training and development coordinator
  • Education: recruiting coordinator specialist, director, assistant director
  • Apparel industry: department manager
  • Entertainment industry: general manager, operations system administrator
  • Career preparation: career advisor
  • Human resources: HR officer
  • Creative management
  • Project management
  • Product management
  • Recruitment officer
  • Chief financial officer

“Projects such as introducing a local franchise into the global marketplace enabled me to pursue an entrepreneurial venture and led me to be aware of global regulations and competitive business environments.”


— Rumana Khan, Alumna

“I was able to get one-on-one interaction with all my professors and because of this support and guidance I am now ready to enter the business world.”


— Karina Lema, Alumna

“I have learned many tactics such as how to operate a business, how to work with others, how to make tough decisions and how to become a better leader.”


— Jennifer Estrada, Alumna

Facilities

Intimate classrooms, state-of-the-art auditorium, MAC and PC computer labs, on-campus library, and art galleries.

Courses

Management majors learn skills in the various functions of business, such as organizational behavior, accounting, finance and marketing. Students will learn legal, global, ethical, operational, and strategic principles through this dynamic curriculum.

MGMT 100: Fundamentals of Business Entrepreneurship
This course allows students to discover how a business works and how it impacts society. Business is studied as an integral part of a total social, political, and economic environment in all its various functional areas: accounting, finance, management, marketing, human relations, and how these areas interact. It explores how entrepreneurs find, screen, and evaluate ideas for new business opportunities. A key part of the course focuses on student teams’ development of a business plan for a new venture. Prerequisites: None.

MGMT 110: Legal Environment of Business
This course allows students to discover how a business works and how it impacts society. Business is studied as an integral part of a total social, political, and economic environment in all its various functional areas: accounting, finance, management, marketing, human relations, and how these areas interact. It explores how entrepreneurs find, screen, and evaluate ideas for new business opportunities. A key part of the course focuses on student teams’ development of a business plan for a new venture. Prerequisites: None.

MGMT 301: Organizational Communication
The practice of written and oral skills as applied to human relations in an organizational setting. Emphasis is on the principles of effective listening, perceptual processes in communications, including an awareness of current issues such as the role of electronic media and communication processes within an organization. Prerequisites: MGMT 100, Management and Organizational Behavior, COMM 120, Public Speaking and WRIT 112, Academic Writing II.

MGMT 326: Management and Organizational Behavior
This course is a comprehensive overview of the management process and organizational behavior. The focus of the course is on understanding and managing human behavior in organizations. Topics include: fundamentals of planning, organizing; organizational culture and leadership; motivation; communication, managing across cultures; ethics and social responsibility; human resource management and development; interpersonal skills; teamwork and group dynamics; diversity; power and politics; authority and influence; managing change and conflict. High level of participation is garnered through the use of cases, simulations, discussion, and the class itself is viewed as a virtual organization. Prerequisites: MGMT 100, Fundamentals of Business Entrepreneurship and WRIT 112, Academic Writing II

ACCT 205 Financial Accounting for Decision Making
In this course, students will learn the principles of accrual accounting, basic processes of financial record keeping, and use of basic financial statements. Emphasis is on learning the strengths and weaknesses of financial accounting in order to better use accounting information to make financial decisions. Prerequisites: MGMT 100, Fundamentals of Business Enterprise; and MATH 220, Business Mathematics or MATH 249, College Algebra.

ACCT 206 Managerial Accounting for Decision Making
In this course, students will learn advanced topics in accounting with an emphasis on managerial accounting, including inventory costing, capital and operational budgeting, and break-even analysis. Prerequisite: ACCT 205, Financial Accounting for Decision Making.

MGMT 335 Managing Workplace Diversity
This course familiarizes students with the implications of increasing workplace diversity in the United States. It explores the complex interplay of ethnic, racial, gender, and other forms of diversity in organizations and its implications for decision making and organizational change. Lecture. Prerequisites: MGMT 110, Legal Environment of Business and WRIT 111, Academic Writing I.

MGMT 336 Management of Information Systems
This course analyzes the role played by information systems in a successful organization at the strategic level, where information technologies and systems can provide major competitive opportunities, and at the operational level, where the continuous flow of useful data and information is vital to managers. Students will develop the skills to use available information channels effectively and initiate new ones when the need arises. Lecture. Prerequisite: WRIT 111, Academic Writing I.

MGMT 340: Social and Political Environment of Business
This course is designed to explore the relationship between business and government in the United States. Through this course, the influence of environmental forces on business institutions and the impact of corporations on their environment will be studied. A central theme will be how business- society interaction changes the way companies are managed. Topics include business ethics, social responsibility, environmental policy, regulation, consumerism, affirmative action, politics, and current trends in organizational structures. Lecture. Prerequisites: MGMT 100, Fundamentals of Business Enterprise and WRIT 111, Academic Writing I.

MGMT 345: Global Enterprise
This course is an introduction to international business, including a review of those aspects of international economics, finance, and trade affecting international business decisions and operations. Topics include multinational enterprises, legal, political and socio-cultural considerations, and a survey of managerial solutions for recent and future trends in international business. Lecture. Prerequisites: MGMT 100, Fundamentals of Business Enterprise and WRIT 112, Academic Writ-ing II or WRIT 212, Rhetoric and Design.

MGMT 350: Business Ethics
This course explores the process of ethical decision making in organizations. It emphasizes the development and application of moral concepts in the resolution of ethical dilemmas faced by managers and entrepreneurs and addresses the issue of social responsibility in the worldwide capitalist economic system. Lecture. Prerequisites: MGMT 110, Legal Environment of Business; MGMT 326, Management and Organizational Behavior; PHIL 210, Ethical Systems; PSYC 200, Intro-duction to Psychology; and WRIT 112, Academic Writing II or WRIT 212, Rhetoric and Design.

MGMT 366: Small Business Management
This course looks at practical solutions to common problems and decisions facing the small business manager. Topics include raising capital, organization, record keeping and accounting, personnel management, inventory control, marketing and sales, and taxes. Lecture. Prerequisites: FINA 360, Financial Management; and WRIT 112, Academic Writing II or WRIT 212, Rhetoric and Design.

MGMT 400: Operations Methods in Value Chain Management
Value Chain Management looks at the entire stream of value-adding units and activities in an organization. The categories include primary line-management activities from inbound logistics, production, marketing and sales, outbound services, and return actions. It also includes staff functions such as HR, infrastructure concerns, development, and purchasing. The course focuses on the quantitative techniques utilized by managers in these areas for problem solving and deci-sion making in business, including areas such as linear programming models, inventory and production models, decision making and project scheduling under certainty and uncertainty, transportation and trans-shipment techniques, decision tree construction and analysis, and PERT/CPM. Prerequisites: MATH 220, Business Mathematics or MATH 249, College Algebra; MATH 226, Busi-ness Statistics; MGMT 336, Management of Information Systems; and FINA 360, Financial Management.

MGMT 460: Managing Change and Conflict
This course provides a theoretical foundation for the change process, with practice in the application of concepts to genuine situations through the case-study method and simulations. Students will study the dynamics of change in individuals, groups, and organizations, focusing on theory, research, and current practices of facilitating the change process. Students will also study conflict versus confrontation and the development of skills needed to plan and augment change. There will be a testing of theories learned through group and individual projects such as role-playing, inter-viewing, real-world change incidents, and the group decision process. Lecture. Prerequisites: MGMT 326, Management and Organizational Behavior; and WRIT 112, Academic Writing II or WRIT 212, Rhetoric and Design.

MGMT 461: Leadership Theory and Practice
This course provides an examination of current theory in the burgeoning field of leadership studies, emphasizing leadership skills and their place in human resources management. Ideas of self-awareness, understanding the role of the leader, and sensitivity to individuals and groups will be taught. Students will learn the significance and implementation of vision statements and engage in a study of inspiration versus domination and motivation versus manipulation. Students will also explore the creation of positive self-image and group identity. Course activities include lecture, case study, experiential exercises, and group process. Lecture. Prerequisites: MGMT 326, Management and Organizational Behavior; MGMT 350, Business Ethics; and WRIT 112, Academic Writ-ing II or WRIT 212, Rhetoric and Design.

MGMT 474 Project Management
This course examines characteristics, problems, techniques, and methods of project management. Projects are typically short-term and high-tempo in nature and must be conducted within cost, scope, and time constraints. The course provides conceptual and concrete operational tools for projects and decision making in organizations using Program Evaluation and Review Techniques (PERT), Critical Path Method (CPM), and MS Project Systems. Students will study project management textbooks, learn project management software, and analyze project management problems and cases. Prerequisites: MGMT 336, Management of Information Systems; and WRIT 112, Academic Writing II or WRIT 212, Rhetoric and Design.

MGMT 483: Business Policy and Strategy
This course is the “capstone” course for business majors. It provides an opportunity to integrate previous studies in the functional areas of marketing, finance, accounting, production, and management. Organizations are analyzed with respect to the effectiveness and appropriateness of strategies and goals in each of the functional areas and the synergies of those areas for achieving optimal results consistent with their respective missions. The major topics covered include competitive analysis, the strategic management process, the role of the chief executive officer, strategy formulation and decision making, and strategy implementation. Lecture. Prerequisites: Senior standing; MGMT 400, Operations Methods in Value Chain Management; and WRIT 112, Academic Writing II or WRIT 212, Rhetoric and Design. Note: A minimum grade of “C” or better in this course is required to graduate.

MGMT 490: Management Internship
Students gain practical experience in management through on-the-job experience complemented by an academic requirement and periodic meetings with the internship coordinator. Students are required to complete a contract in advance of registration, perform at least 120 hours in the internship, and submit an application, weekly reports, mid-term and end-of-term evaluations by the student and the supervisor, and a minimum ten-page report of the experience. Prerequisites: Management major with senior standing and contract approval by the internship coordinator and/or the Management department coordinator.

MGMT 327: Human Resources Management
This course explores basic principles underlying formulation and administration of human resource management, such as recruitment, selection, orientation, training, development, compensation, benefits, safety, and health. Lecture. Prerequisites: MGMT 326, Management and Organizational Behavior and WRIT 112, Academic Writing II or WRIT 212, Rhetoric and Design.

MGMT 330: Managerial Persuasion
This course provides an understanding of the theory and processes of bargaining, persuading, and negotiation in organizational settings. Students develop skills through extensive case analyses, role playing, and simulations. This is designed for the broad spectrum of bargaining problems typically encountered in business. Lecture. Prerequisites: MGMT 326, Management and Organizational Behavior and WRIT 112, Academic Writing II or WRIT 212, Rhetoric and Design.

MGMT 360: Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship
This course provides an overview of the basic principles and processes of entrepreneurship. The entire entrepreneurial process is investigated, including conceptualizing, identifying and quantify-ing opportunities, and examining tax and legal considerations. Topics include start-up opportunity analysis/assessment, self-appraisal of entrepreneurial characteristics and leadership potential, the business plan, financing and raising capital, and building and leading an effective organization. Lecture. Prerequisites: MGMT 100, Fundamentals of Business Enterprise; FINA 360, Financial Management; and WRIT 112, Academic Writing II or WRIT 212, Rhetoric and Design.

MGMT 364: Family Business Management
This course focuses on the challenges and opportunities of managing the interests of two distinct yet overlapping institutions: the firm and the family. Key topics include understanding the unique-ness of family business in terms of culture, stages of evolution, career planning, business owner-ship, family structure, sibling rivalry, insurance and legal issues, and organizational issues such as succession and estate planning. Realworld family cases are examined in depth and local family business owners serve as invited speakers. Lecture. Prerequisites: MGMT 326, Management and Organizational Behavior; FINA 360, Financial Management; and WRIT 112, Academic Writing II or WRIT 212, Rhetoric and Design.

MGMT 367: New Venture Creation
This course focuses on the pre-start-up, start-up, and early growth of business ventures. Subject matter of the course is organized around the following themes: seeking and evaluating opportunities for new ventures, leveraging resources to convert those opportunities into viable businesses, and developing appropriate entry and exit strategies. Taking an applied approach, each student interviews a local entrepreneur and develops a detailed business plan for a new venture that they believe has the potential to impress a prospective investor. Lecture. Prerequisites: MGMT 360, Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship; and WRIT 112, Academic Writing II or WRIT 212, Rhetoric and Design.

MGMT 368 E-Commerce Fundamentals
This course is designed to provide an overview of the key elements of e-commerce. It introduces students to the fundamentals of doing business in the digital economy. Topics include e-commerce; Internet technology; e-commerce applications in the field of marketing, business to business (B2B) and business to consumer (B2C) network platforms; and legal, security, tax, and policy issues pertaining to e-Commerce. Lecture. Prerequisites: MGMT 100, Fundamentals of Busi-ness Enterprise; and WRIT 112, Academic Writing II or WRIT 212, Rhetoric and Design.

MGMT 370: Topics in Management
Topics focus on current issues in management. Lecture. Prerequisites: MGMT 326, Management and Organizational Behavior, Sophomore standing, and permission of the instructor.

MGMT 374 Production and Operations Management
This course focuses on principles and techniques in industrial management. Topics include risk and forecasting, financing, production research and development, production planning, quality and materials control, and budgetary control as factors in management. Lecture. Prerequisites: MGMT 336, Management of Information Systems; and WRIT 112, Academic Writing II or WRIT 212, Rhetoric and Design.

MGMT 375: International Field Experience
This course is designed to give students interested in international business the opportunity to travel internationally in order to observe and analyze, first-hand, aspects of the global business environment. Prerequisites: Approval by the instructor and payment of deposit.

MGMT 420: Compensation and Benefits Management
This course focuses on techniques of wage/ salary administration. Students will review job de-scriptions and job design as foundations for job analysis. The course examines methods and techniques of job evaluation and methods of determining appropriate pay ranges with employee benefits as part of compensation. The area of performance appraisal is examined as the basis for incentive plans. Lecture. Prerequisites: MGMT 327, Human Resources Management; MGMT 336, Management of Information Systems; FINA 360, Financial Management; and WRIT 112, Academic Writing II or WRIT 212, Rhetoric and Design.

MGMT 465: International Management
This course focuses on identification, analysis, and resolution of managerial issues of organizations and policy for global managers both here and abroad. Emphasis is placed on the special problems of adaptation to different sociological, cultural, legal, political, and economic forces. Lecture. Prerequisites: MGMT 345, Global Enterprise; and WRIT 112, Academic Writing II or WRIT 212, Rhetoric and Design.

Accreditations

AACSB International: The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business
ACBSP: Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs
WSCUC: Senior College and University Commission (formerly WASC)